Chess

A brain game that is played between two players.


Life skills I have gotten to learn from chess as a student of chess.

I am in year 8 and honestly have learnt a lot about chess and these are some of the great things I have learnt about chess that have made me love chess more and more.

  1. Problem Solving

In its most simplistic form, I have learnt to use problem-solving skills to decide which pieces I should move to yield the best results on the board. As players advance and start playing timed games, chess teaches students how to solve problems on-the-fly.

2. Patience

The average game of chess goes on for about 40 moves before one player emerges victorious over the other. Each of these moves must be carefully calculated, planned and executed. The slightest lapse in concentration could lose a pawn, or an overly aggressive move could lead to a checkmate for the opposing player.

This careful calculation has taught me the virtue of patience. Not only must I stay focused while waiting for an opponent to take his or her turn, but I must also exercise patience by not rushing the number of moves it takes to complete the game. The same simply cannot be said of sporting events where the game is over when time runs out and an aggressive defence can often force a turnover. A chess game can last 20 minutes or several hours.

3. Creative Thinking

To defeat my opponent, I must become a creative thinker. During each game, and need to imagine what will happen with each possible move on the board and then quickly come up with new strategies on the fly.


4. Strategic Thinking


As a student I combine all the skills above as I learn to play chess, and develop my strategic thinking skills. I learn to combine problem solving, pattern recognition and creative thinking to make my moves. I discover how to be patient until just the right moment for a big move, and learn that each loss is just an opportunity to perform better the next time. Most importantly, students learn how to develop and execute a strategy.


5. Sportsmanship


As a student I learn chess by discovering which moves work and which ones don’t in certain scenarios. In a chess game, there's almost always a winner and as a student will quickly find that they're going to lose matches from time to time.

Games and activities where there's a clear-cut winner encourage us students to become more sportsmanlike, when they win and when they lose. When we learn early to be good sports, it’s easier for them to overcome loss or failure later on in life.

NB I HAVE LEARNED THAT EACH LOSS IS JUST AN OPPURTUNITY FOR ME TO PERFORM BETTER!

By Andrew Weraga
Year 8







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